Life-threatening versus non-life-threatening manual strangulation: are there appropriate criteria for MR imaging of the neck?

@article{Christe2009LifethreateningVN,
  title={Life-threatening versus non-life-threatening manual strangulation: are there appropriate criteria for MR imaging of the neck?},
  author={Andreas Christe and Harriet C. Thoeny and Steffen G. Ross and Danny Spendlove and Dechen Tshering and S. A. Bolliger and Silke Grabherr and Michael Thali and Peter Vock and Lars Oesterhelweg},
  journal={European Radiology},
  year={2009},
  volume={19},
  pages={1882-1889}
}
The aim of the study was to determine objective radiological signs of danger to life in survivors of manual strangulation and to establish a radiological scoring system for the differentiation between life-threatening and non-life-threatening strangulation by dividing the cross section of the neck into three zones (superficial, middle and deep zone). Forensic pathologists classified 56 survivors of strangulation into life-threatening and non-life-threatening cases by history and clinical… 

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