Life-threatening Airway Obstruction: An Unusual Presentation of a Cervical Mass During Infancy

Abstract

Received September 5, 2005 Abstract Cervical masses during infancy are almost always benign. The more common differential diagnoses include congenital malformations of the vascular or lymphatic systems, remnants of the branchial arches, sternocleidomastoid tumour of infancy, and lymphadenitis. Benign tumours such as dermoid cysts or teratomas are uncommon, and malignant lesions are extremely rare. The authors reported a 4-month-old infant who presented with respiratory arrest secondary to upper airway obstruction caused by a cervical neuroblastoma. The child was successfully resuscitated but required mechanical ventilation. Subsequent surgical excision without chemotherapy led to complete clinical, radiological, and biochemical remission. Neck masses during early childhood should be handled with care and malignant lesions should be distinguished from the more common but self-limiting causes.

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Lau2006LifethreateningAO, title={Life-threatening Airway Obstruction: An Unusual Presentation of a Cervical Mass During Infancy}, author={Yung R Lau and Ch ao Li and K Tsui and A Lee}, year={2006} }