Life stress, the "kindling" hypothesis, and the recurrence of depression: considerations from a life stress perspective.

@article{Monroe2005LifeST,
  title={Life stress, the "kindling" hypothesis, and the recurrence of depression: considerations from a life stress perspective.},
  author={Scott M. Monroe and Kate L. Harkness},
  journal={Psychological review},
  year={2005},
  volume={112 2},
  pages={
          417-45
        }
}
Major depression is frequently characterized by recurrent episodes over the life course. First lifetime episodes of depression, however, are typically more strongly associated with major life stress than are successive recurrences. A key theoretical issue involves how the role of major life stress changes from an initial episode over subsequent recurrences. The primary conceptual framework for research on life stress and recurrence of depression is the "kindling" hypothesis (R. M. Post, 1992… 

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