Life in the slow lane revisited: ontogenetic separation between chimpanzees and humans.

@article{Walker2006LifeIT,
  title={Life in the slow lane revisited: ontogenetic separation between chimpanzees and humans.},
  author={Robert Walker and Kim R. Hill and Oskar F. Burger and Ana Magdalena Hurtado},
  journal={American journal of physical anthropology},
  year={2006},
  volume={129 4},
  pages={
          577-83
        }
}
This study investigates the evolution of human growth by analyzing differences in body mass growth trajectories among three populations: the Ache of eastern Paraguay, the US (NHANES, 1999-2000), and captive chimpanzees. The relative growth statistic "A" from the mammalian growth law is allowed to vary with age and proves useful for comparing growth across different ages, populations, and species. We demonstrate ontogenetic separation between chimpanzees and humans, and show that interspecific… 

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