Life events and affective disorders

@article{Paykel2003LifeEA,
  title={Life events and affective disorders},
  author={Eugene S. Paykel},
  journal={Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica},
  year={2003},
  volume={108}
}
  • E. Paykel
  • Published 4 September 2003
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica
Objective:  To summarize research in life events and affective disorders 
The Munich vulnerability study on affective disorders: premorbid psychometric profile of affected individuals
TLDR
A longitudinal high‐risk study was conducted to identify psychometric vulnerability markers for affective disorders and found three markers were associated with vulnerability to major depressive disorders.
Positive and negative life events and personality traits in predicting course of depression and anxiety
TLDR
Positive and negative life events and personality traits in predicting course of depression and anxiety and the role of self-confidence and neuroticism are studied.
Major life events and development of major depression in Parkinson's disease patients
TLDR
This work aims to address the relationship between major life events and depression amongst PD patients free of depressive symptoms at baseline with a focus on patients with no history of depression.
How to recognize depressive disorders in children and adolescents
  • B. Greenberg
  • Medicine
    JAAPA : official journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants
  • 2009
Mental health disorders are difficult to diagnose in the nonadult patient. Complications range from limited language and communications skills to a struggle for autonomy.
35Depression, Bipolar Syndromes, and Schizophrenia
Keywords Major depressive disorder; Biopolar disorder; Schizophrenia; Mood disorders; Biogenic amine hypothesis; Learned helplessness; Antidepressant drugs; Mood stabilizers; Dopamine hypothesis;
Stressful life events as predictors of functioning: findings from the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study
TLDR
The extent to which PD subjects differ in rates of life events and the extent toWhich life events impact psychosocial functioning was examined.
Erratum to: The relationship between negative life events, psychological distress and life satisfaction: a population-based study
Purpose Negative life events may increase psychological distress and reduce life satisfaction (LS). This study investigates associations between negative life events and both positive and negative
Hypocortisolism in recurrent affective disorders
Bipolar disorders and recurrent depressions are two common psychiatric disorders with a life time prevalence of approximately 1% and 8%, respectively. Despite treatment these patients suffer from a
Personality, Life Events and the Course of Anxiety and Depression
Using data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety, we examined among 1322 participants with a DSM–IV diagnosis of depression or anxiety: (i) whether positive and negative life events
Depressive disorders. A diagnostic and therapeutic challenge also for primary care
TLDR
This review provides basic knowledge on epidemiology, diagnosis, pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy to enable successful primary care of depressive disorders patients.
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References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 77 REFERENCES
Life events and early and late onset of bipolar disorder.
TLDR
The late-onset group reported the occurrence of significantly more stressful life events before the first and before the latest episode of affective illness than the early-ONSet group did.
Life events and relapse in bipolar affective disorder.
In a 2 year study of life events and relapse in a cohort of 62 patients with bipolar affective disorder, an excess of events was found during the month immediately preceding relapse. Of 52 relapses
Life events and relapse in bipolar disorder: The impact of a catastrophic event
TLDR
The results suggest that certain bipolar patients, especially those recently unstable, may be more vulnerable to the impact of life events, and the literature on life events and the precipitation of bipolar disorder is reviewed.
Life events and the course of bipolar disorder.
TLDR
Surviving analyses indicated a significant association between life events and relapse or recurrence of the disorder and could not be explained by differences in levels of medication or compliance.
Alcoholism, depression, and life events.
TLDR
The data indicate a close relationship between negative events and the secondary depression of alcoholism and suggest that the alcoholic with secondary depression is at greater risk for suicide than the alcoholic without a depressive syndrome.
Life events and mania: a case-controlled study.
TLDR
There were a significantly greater number of uncontrolled and unanticipated life events in the patients with bipolar affective disorder as compared to those without a mania, but neither the total number of life events nor measures of distress and stress distinguished bipolar patients with as compared with those without mania.
Life stress and symptom pattern in out-patient depression.
TLDR
There was an association between symptoms reflecting the endogenous-neurotic distinction and life stress, but the association was relatively weak, and was mainly with total social problems at the time of presentation, rather than with life events at onset.
Life events, depression and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function.
TLDR
Antecedent life events were associated with first episodes of depression and with greater severity of illness, but their presence did not distinguish between patients diagnosed as endogenous or neurotic, and status on the dexamethasone suppression test was not associated with a greater or lesser likelihood of antecedent events.
Adversity and the Symptoms of Depression
Data from a community survey were used to test the proposition that pathological guilt and vegetative symptoms of depression were less likely to be associated with stressful life events and
Psychosocial factors and episode number in depression.
TLDR
No significant differences were apparent in the incidence of chronic stress in the different depressive episodes of the patient group or in the comparison of this group with controls, and no second order interaction between life events and chronic stress was found.
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