Life Without TV? Cultivation Theory and Psychosocial Health Characteristics of Television-Free Individuals and Their Television-Viewing Counterparts

@article{Hammermeister2005LifeWT,
  title={Life Without TV? Cultivation Theory and Psychosocial Health Characteristics of Television-Free Individuals and Their Television-Viewing Counterparts},
  author={J. Hammermeister and Barbara L. Brock and D. Winterstein and R. Page},
  journal={Health Communication},
  year={2005},
  volume={17},
  pages={253 - 264}
}
  • J. Hammermeister, Barbara L. Brock, +1 author R. Page
  • Published 2005
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Health Communication
  • Much attention has been paid to the amount of time Americans spend watching television. Cultivation theory has been important in exploring behavioral effects of television viewing for many years. However, psychosocial health has received much less scrutiny in relation to television viewing time. This investigation examined the hypotheses that television-free individuals and viewers adhering to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommendations (up to 2 hr of viewing per day) would display… CONTINUE READING
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