Life Span of Individual Yeast Cells

@article{Mortimer1959LifeSO,
  title={Life Span of Individual Yeast Cells},
  author={R. Mortimer and J. R. Johnston},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1959},
  volume={183},
  pages={1751-1752}
}
THE division of a yeast cell by budding gives rise to two cells which are identifiable, that is, the mother cell from which the bud arose, and the daughter cell which developed from the bud. The wall of the daughter cell presumably is synthesized de novo while that of the mother cell retains all or at least part of its identity through the division—an example of linear inheritance1. That the wall of the mother cell is not reformed is evidenced by the accumulation of scars associated with each… Expand
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