• Corpus ID: 7171812

Life Redesigned To Suit the Engineering Crowd Evolution is not fast or efficient enough for engineers who plan to move blocks of genes around as routinely as they do electronic parts

@inproceedings{ngineers2006LifeRT,
  title={Life Redesigned To Suit the Engineering Crowd Evolution is not fast or efficient enough for engineers who plan to move blocks of genes around as routinely as they do electronic parts},
  author={E ngineers and Drew Endy},
  year={2006}
}
E ngineers known as biosynthesists are leading a revolution in molecular biology. Instead of old-fashioned genetic engineering—last generation’s revolution—where one gene at a time is moved between microbial species, these engineers have far more radical plans. At this early stage, for instance, they are mixing genes from several different organisms to build whole new metabolic pathways and novel microbes. Some biosynthesists even expect to rewrite the genetic code altogether, designing… 

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