Life, chance & life chances

@article{Daston2008LifeC,
  title={Life, chance \& life chances},
  author={Lorraine Daston},
  journal={Daedalus},
  year={2008},
  volume={137},
  pages={5-14}
}
The principles of justice are chosen behind a veil of ignorance. This ensures that no one is advantaged or disadvantaged in the choice of principles by the outcome of natural chance or the contingency of social circumstances. Since all are similarly situated and no one is able to design principles to favor his particular condition, the principles of justice are the result of a fair agreement or bargain. 
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References

Why race still matters
Daedalus Winter 2005 Why has race mattered in so many times and places? Why does it still matter? Put more precisely, why has there been such a pervasive tendency to apply the category of race and to