Liana competition with tropical trees varies seasonally but not with tree species identity.

@article{Leonor2015LianaCW,
  title={Liana competition with tropical trees varies seasonally but not with tree species identity.},
  author={Alvarez-Cansino Leonor and Stefan A. Schnitzer and Joseph Pignatello Reid and Jennifer S. Powers},
  journal={Ecology},
  year={2015},
  volume={96 1},
  pages={
          39-45
        }
}
Lianas in tropical forests compete intensely with trees for above- and belowground resources and limit tree growth and regeneration. Liana competition with adult canopy trees may be particularly strong, and, if lianas compete more intensely with some tree species than others, they may influence tree species composition. We performed the first systematic, large-scale liana removal experiment to assess the competitive effects of lianas on multiple tropical tree species by measuring sap velocity… 

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