Lexical stress without postlexical head‐marking: Evidence from Tagalog

@article{Anderson2006LexicalSW,
  title={Lexical stress without postlexical head‐marking: Evidence from Tagalog},
  author={Victoria B. Anderson},
  journal={Journal of the Acoustical Society of America},
  year={2006},
  volume={120},
  pages={3092-3092}
}
  • V. Anderson
  • Published 2006
  • History
  • Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
Jun (2005) compares prosodic prominence types in 21 languages representing diverse families (including Australian, Chinese, Germanic, Muskogean, Romance, and Semitic, but none from Austronesian). Jun observes an implicational relationship between the prominence type a language uses at the lexical level (i.e., lexical tone, stress or pitch accent) and the prominence type it uses postlexically (i.e., head‐marking or edge‐marking). Fourteen languages in the sample employ lexical stress; all use… Expand
3 Citations
Philippine English (Metro Manila acrolect)
  • M. Lesho
  • History
  • Journal of the International Phonetic Association
  • 2017
English is an official language in the Philippines, along with Filipino, a standardized register originally based on Tagalog (Gonzalez 1998). The Philippines were a Spanish colony for over threeExpand
The Sociophonetics and Phonology of the Cavite Chabacano Vowel System
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