Levodopa-induced changes in synaptic dopamine levels increase with progression of Parkinson's disease: implications for dyskinesias.

@article{delaFuenteFernandez2004LevodopainducedCI,
  title={Levodopa-induced changes in synaptic dopamine levels increase with progression of Parkinson's disease: implications for dyskinesias.},
  author={Raúl de la Fuente-Fernández and Vesna Sossi and Zhigao Huang and Sarah Furtado and Jian-Qiang Lu and Donald B. Calne and Thomas J. Ruth and A. Jon Stoessl},
  journal={Brain : a journal of neurology},
  year={2004},
  volume={127 Pt 12},
  pages={
          2747-54
        }
}
Peak-dose dyskinesias are abnormal movements that usually occur 1 h after oral administration of levodopa, and often complicate chronic treatment of Parkinson's disease. We investigated by PET with [11C]raclopride whether Parkinson's disease progression modifies the striatal changes in synaptic dopamine levels induced by levodopa administration, and whether this modification, if present, could have an impact on the emergence of dyskinesias. We found that, 1 h after oral administration of… Expand
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