Leveraging the asymmetric sensitivity of eye contact for videoconference

@inproceedings{Chen2002LeveragingTA,
  title={Leveraging the asymmetric sensitivity of eye contact for videoconference},
  author={Milton Chen},
  booktitle={CHI},
  year={2002}
}
Eye contact is a natural and often essential element in the language of visual communication. Unfortunately, perceiving eye contact is difficult in most video-conferencing systems and hence limits their effectiveness. We conducted experiments to determine how accurately people perceive eye contact. We discovered that the sensitivity to eye contact is asymmetric, in that we are an order of magnitude less sensitive to eye contact when people look below our eyes than when they look to the left… CONTINUE READING
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