Levels of Neonatal Care

@article{Stark2004LevelsON,
  title={Levels of Neonatal Care},
  author={Ann R. Stark},
  journal={Pediatrics},
  year={2004},
  volume={114},
  pages={1341 - 1347}
}
  • A. Stark
  • Published 1 November 2004
  • Medicine
  • Pediatrics
The concept of designations for hospital facilities that care for newborn infants according to the level of complexity of care provided was first proposed in 1976. Subsequent diversity in the definitions and application of levels of care has complicated facility-based evaluation of clinical outcomes, resource allocation and utilization, and service delivery. We review data supporting the need for uniform nationally applicable definitions and the clinical basis for a proposed classification… 

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Data supporting the need for uniform nationally applicable definitions and the clinical basis for a proposed classification based on complexity of care are reviewed.

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