Levamisole can induce conditioned taste aversion in foxes

@article{Massei2003LevamisoleCI,
  title={Levamisole can induce conditioned taste aversion in foxes},
  author={G. Massei and Alicia Lyon and D. Cowan},
  journal={Wildlife Research},
  year={2003},
  volume={30},
  pages={633-637}
}
Conditioned Taste Aversion (CTA) develops when animals associate the taste of a particular food with illness and subsequently avoid consuming that food. We evaluated the potential of two chemicals, thiabendazole and levamisole hydrochloride, to induce CTA to meat in captive foxes (Vulpes vulpes). Foxes were presented for 45 min with thiabendazole or levamisole-treated meat (treatment group) or with untreated meat (control group). In subsequent tests, carried out at 3-week intervals, we tested… Expand
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