Lethal aggression in Pan is better explained by adaptive strategies than human impacts

@article{Wilson2014LethalAI,
  title={Lethal aggression in Pan is better explained by adaptive strategies than human impacts},
  author={M. Wilson and C. Boesch and B. Fruth and T. Furuichi and I. Gilby and C. Hashimoto and C. Hobaiter and G. Hohmann and Noriko Itoh and K. Koops and Julia N. Lloyd and T. Matsuzawa and J. Mitani and D. Mjungu and D. Morgan and M. Muller and R. Mundry and Michio Nakamura and J. Pruetz and A. Pusey and J. Riedel and C. Sanz and A. Schel and Nicole Simmons and M. Waller and D. Watts and F. White and R. Wittig and K. Zuberb{\"u}hler and R. Wrangham},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2014},
  volume={513},
  pages={414-417}
}
Observations of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and bonobos (Pan paniscus) provide valuable comparative data for understanding the significance of conspecific killing. Two kinds of hypothesis have been proposed. Lethal violence is sometimes concluded to be the result of adaptive strategies, such that killers ultimately gain fitness benefits by increasing their access to resources such as food or mates. Alternatively, it could be a non-adaptive result of human impacts, such as habitat change or… Expand
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