Lethal Interactions Between Parasites and Prey Increase Niche Diversity in a Tropical Community

@article{Condon2014LethalIB,
  title={Lethal Interactions Between Parasites and Prey Increase Niche Diversity in a Tropical Community},
  author={M. A. Condon and S. Scheffer and M. L. Lewis and R. Wharton and D. Adams and A. Forbes},
  journal={Science},
  year={2014},
  volume={343},
  pages={1240 - 1244}
}
  • M. A. Condon, S. Scheffer, +3 authors A. Forbes
  • Published 2014
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Science
  • Hidden Diversity Why are there so many species in the tropics? Niche partitioning by highly specialized plant species seems to be the main generator of high diversity. Condon et al. (p. 1240; see the Perspective by Godfray) show that niche partitioning can also be generated by interactions between plant resources and parasites, resulting in hyperdiverse communities. The cryptic diversity of 14 neotropical fly pollinators and 18 of their highly specific wasp parasites induced mortality… CONTINUE READING
    48 Citations

    Topics from this paper.

    Determinants of parasitoid communities of willow‐galling sawflies: habitat overrides physiology, host plant and space
    • 10
    Genetic differentiation associated with host plants and geography among six widespread species of South American Blepharoneura fruit flies (Tephritidae)
    • 6
    Tree phylogenetic diversity promotes host–parasitoid interactions
    • 28
    • PDF
    Anatomy of a Neotropical insect radiation
    • 6
    • PDF

    References

    SHOWING 1-10 OF 80 REFERENCES
    Cascading host-associated genetic differentiation in parasitoids of phytophagous insects
    • 145
    • PDF
    Host specificity of Lepidoptera in tropical and temperate forests
    • 380
    • PDF
    Why Are There So Many Species of Herbivorous Insects in Tropical Rainforests?
    • 437
    • PDF
    BUTTERFLIES AND PLANTS: A STUDY IN COEVOLUTION
    • 3,547
    • PDF
    Unprecedented ichneumonid parasitoid wasp diversity in tropical forests
    • 59
    • PDF