Lessons learned from "the skeptical environmentalist": an environmental health perspective.

@article{Bodnr2004LessonsLF,
  title={Lessons learned from "the skeptical environmentalist": an environmental health perspective.},
  author={{\'A}gnes Bodn{\'a}r and Rosemary Castorina and Manish A. Desai and Paurene Duramad and Susan L. Fischer and Neil E. Klepeis and Song Liang and Sumi Mehta and Kyra Naumoff and Elizabeth M. Noth and Morten A. Schei and Linwei Tian and Kathleen L Vork and Kirk R. Smith},
  journal={International journal of hygiene and environmental health},
  year={2004},
  volume={207 1},
  pages={
          57-67
        }
}
Few books about the environment have generated as much heated debate as Bjørn Lomborg's 'The Skeptical Environmentalist: Measuring the Real State of the World', published by Cambridge University Press in 2001. A flavor of the controversy can be gleaned from a series of reviews and rebuttals published in 'Scientific American' (Rennie 2002). In general, most positive reviews appeared in the popular press (e.g., 'The Economist', 'Washington Post Book Review', 'The Wall Street Journal') and most… 

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