Lessons from the margins of globalization: appreciating the Cuban health paradox

@article{Spiegel2004LessonsFT,
  title={Lessons from the margins of globalization: appreciating the Cuban health paradox},
  author={Jerry M. Spiegel and Annalee Yassi},
  journal={Journal of Public Health Policy},
  year={2004},
  volume={25},
  pages={85-110}
}
  • J. Spiegel, A. Yassi
  • Published 2004
  • Political Science, Medicine
  • Journal of Public Health Policy
It is widely recognized that Cuba, despite poor economic performance, has achieved and sustained health indices comparable to those in developed countries—the Cuban Paradox. There has been, however, remarkably little scholarship evaluating how this has been accomplished, especially during a period of extreme economic hardship. Cuba’s exclusion from the mainstream of “globalization”, moreover, allows us to gain insights into the population health impact of policies that have accompanied… Expand
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