Lesions in supplementary motor area interfere with a monkey's performance of a bimanual coordination task

@article{Brinkman1981LesionsIS,
  title={Lesions in supplementary motor area interfere with a monkey's performance of a bimanual coordination task},
  author={Cobie Brinkman},
  journal={Neuroscience Letters},
  year={1981},
  volume={27},
  pages={267-270}
}
  • C. Brinkman
  • Published 23 December 1981
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Neuroscience Letters
Abstract Unilateral lesions of the supplementary motor area (SMA) produce a deficit in bimanual coordination which is long-lasting. Both hands tend to be used in an identical manner instead of sharing the work load between them. This finding seems to be consistent with a role of SMA in the programming of movement through instruction of the primary motor area. 
The neuronal activity in the supplementary motor area of primates
  • J. Tanji
  • Psychology
    Trends in Neurosciences
  • 1984
Abstract The functional role of the supplementary motor area (SMA) has been largelyunknown for the 30 years since its definition. However, recent work employing the technique of single cell recording
Bimanual Load-Lifting Task. A Model for the Study of Coordination Between Posture and Movement
The study of motor coordination has gained more and more interest over recent years. It is worthy of interest because in everyday life most of our movements are not restricted to a single joint but
Monitoring Coordination during Bimanual Movements: Where Is the Mastermind?
TLDR
Direct insight is provided into the neural correlates of coordinated bimanual movements and the role of right STG is highlighted, which is more strongly activated in the coordination condition than the SMA, STG, or primary motor cortex.
Simple and complex movements in a patient with infarction of the right supplementary motor area
TLDR
A detailed physiological investigation from a patient with a right SMA lesion is presented and it is suggested that the defect of motor programming in Parkinson's disease is likely to reflect functional deafferentation of the SMA.
Neuronal activity in the primate supplementary motor area and the primary motor cortex in relation to spatio-temporal bimanual coordination.
TLDR
The results suggest that both the SMA and M1 may contribute to the control of sequential bimanual coordinated movements, but the contribution of other cortical and subcortical areas such as cingulate motor cortex and basal ganglia remains to be investigated.
Supplementary motor area of the monkey's cerebral cortex: short- and long-term deficits after unilateral ablation and the effects of subsequent callosal section
  • C. Brinkman
  • Biology, Medicine
    The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience
  • 1984
TLDR
The results imply that SMA may give rise normally to discharges informing the contralateral hemisphere of intended and/or ongoing movements via the corpus callosum, which may prevent duplication of responses during unimanual tasks and help to coordinate the behavior of both hands during a bimanual task.
Cortical mechanisms for acquisition and performance of bimanual motor sequences
TLDR
The data suggest that the acquisition of unimanual and bimanual motor sequences may rely on similar cortical mechanisms, but that the formation of long-term, procedural memories for the two types of sequences might at least in part depend on different mechanisms.
Motor performance of stutterers: a search for mechanisms.
TLDR
Results of research on bimanual coordination in stutterers are consistent with a model that attributes the interference, in part, to interhemispheric processes, possibly involving the supplementary motor area.
Synchronization and desynchronization in bimanual coordination: a developmental perspective1
Abstract Temporal constraints are apparent in all kinds of bimanual activities in adults. They do not seem to influence the spontaneous movements of neonates but can be observed in the goal-directed
The role of the human supplementary motor area in reactive motor operation
TLDR
The role of the supplementary motor area (SMA) in reactive motor operation was investigated with functional magnetic resonance imaging in 13 normal subjects and showed greater activation for reactive than predictive movement during regular cueing.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 12 REFERENCES
Bimanual coordination in monkeys.
TLDR
Testing of monkeys with various midline brain lesions showed that section of either the corpus callosum or tectal cross-connections alone produced only a transient loss of skill in the task, but if forebrain and midbrain commissures were both severed a long-lasting deficit became apparent when the task was attempted without vision.
Supplementary motor area in the monkey: activity of neurons during performance of a learned motor task.
TLDR
The findings suggest that the discharges of a large number of neurons in SMA are changing during particular movements of either arm, and that only a small number of cells receive peripheral afferent sensory input.
The supplementary motor area of the cerebral cortex; a clinical and experimental study.
TLDR
An analysis of observations on the properties of the superior and mesial intermediate precentral cortex in man and the patterns of focal seizures due to discharge in the area are presented, and an attempt is made to interpret the findings in terms of function.
Supplementary and precentral motor cortex: Contrast in responsiveness to peripheral input in the hindlimb area of the unanesthetized monkey
  • S. Wise, J. Tanji
  • Biology, Medicine
    The Journal of comparative neurology
  • 1981
TLDR
The hindlimb representation of MII and the tail representation of MI appear to be considerably further rostral than depicted in the classical maps, which serves to resolve a discrepancy between the classical physiological and cytoarchitectonic maps for this region of cortex.
Frontal lobe inputs to primate motor cortex: evidence for four somatotopically organized ‘premotor’ areas
TLDR
The present experiments sought to define more clearly the origin of frontal lobe inputs to the face, arm and leg areas of the primate motor cortex (area 4) and the distribution of labeled neurons in arhesus monkey with multiple injections of HRP in the arm area of the motor cortex.
Intra- and interhemispheric projections of the precentral, premotor and arcuate areas in the rhesus monkey.
TLDR
The premotor and arcuate regions can be differentiated on the basis of their intrahemispheric connectivity and the non-homotopic projection of the premotor areas are directed to MI, MII, and prefrontal cortex, whereas those from the arcuate areas are observed in the prefrontal cortex only.
The failure of differences in neurally contained acetylcholine to explain differences between carotid body and aortic body chemoreception
TLDR
The present findings eliminate aortic nerve-contained ACh as a component in the chemoreceptors' responses to hypoxemia, and postulate any differences in reflex effects as being due to differences in the central processing of the signals.
...
1
2
...