Leonardo's Eye

@article{Ackerman1978LeonardosE,
  title={Leonardo's Eye},
  author={James Stokes Ackerman},
  journal={Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes},
  year={1978},
  volume={41},
  pages={108 - 146}
}
  • J. Ackerman
  • Published 1 January 1978
  • Art, Philosophy
  • Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes
The eye whereby the beauty of the world is reflected by beholders is of such excellence that whoso consents to its loss deprives himself of the representation of all the works of nature. Because we can see these things owing to our eyes the soul is content to stay imprisoned in the human body; for through the eyes all the various things of nature are represented to the soul. Who loses his eyes leaves his soul in a dark prison without hope of ever again seeing the sun, light of all the world… 
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