Lending a Hand

@article{Coan2006LendingAH,
  title={Lending a Hand},
  author={James Arthur Coan and Hillary S. Schaefer and Richard J. Davidson},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2006},
  volume={17},
  pages={1032 - 1039}
}
Social contact promotes enhanced health and well-being, likely as a function of the social regulation of emotional responding in the face of various life stressors. For this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, 16 married women were subjected to the threat of electric shock while holding their husband's hand, the hand of an anonymous male experimenter, or no hand at all. Results indicated a pervasive attenuation of activation in the neural systems supporting emotional and… Expand
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Holding hands with one’s partner attenuates reactivity in emotional brain areas and reduces between-region connectivity, and the connectivity strength was negatively related to attachment security, with higher reported partner security associated with weaker connectivity. Expand
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