Leibniz's laws of continuity and homogeneity

@article{Katz2012LeibnizsLO,
  title={Leibniz's laws of continuity and homogeneity},
  author={Mikhail G. Katz and David Sherry},
  journal={Notices of the American Mathematical Society},
  year={2012},
  volume={59},
  pages={1550-1558}
}
We explore Leibniz's understanding of the differential calculus, and argue that his methods were more coherent than is generally recognized. The foundations of the historical infinitesimal calculus of Newton and Leibniz have been a target of numerous criticisms. Some of the critics believed to have found logical fallacies in its foundations. We present a detailed textual analysis of Leibniz's seminal text Cum Prodiisset, and argue that Leibniz's system for differential calculus was free of… Expand

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