Legume Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation byβ-Proteobacteria Is Widespread inNature

@article{Chen2003LegumeSN,
  title={Legume Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation by$\beta$-Proteobacteria Is Widespread inNature},
  author={Wen‐Ming Chen and L. Moulin and C. Bontemps and P. Vandamme and G. B{\'e}na and C. Boivin-Masson},
  journal={Journal of Bacteriology},
  year={2003},
  volume={185},
  pages={7266 - 7272}
}
ABSTRACT Following the initial discovery of two legume-nodulating Burkholderia strains (L. Moulin, A. Munive, B. Dreyfus, and C. Boivin-Masson, Nature 411:948-950, 2001), we identified as nitrogen-fixing legume symbionts at least 50 different strains of Burkholderia caribensis and Ralstoniataiwanensis, all belonging to the β-subclass of proteobacteria, thus extending the phylogenetic diversity of the rhizobia. R. taiwanensis was found to represent 93% of the Mimosa isolates in Taiwan… Expand
Legume-nodulating betaproteobacteria: diversity, host range, and future prospects.
TLDR
Initial analyses of genome sequences have suggested that plant-associated Burkholderia spp. Expand
Microbes for Legume Improvement
Bacteria forming nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with legumes were classically named “rhizobia” and currently include more than 50 species distributed in genera Rhizobium, Ensifer, Mesorhizobium,Expand
Phylogeny of symbiotic genes reveals symbiovars within legume-nodulating Paraburkholderia species.
TLDR
Eight strains of nodulating nitrogen-fixing Paraburkholderia isolated in Brazil were used to infer the relatedness between core (16S rDNA, recA) and symbiotic (nod, nif, fix) genes, and the diversity of genes involved in the nodulation and nitrogen fixation abilities was investigated. Expand
Experimental Evolution of Legume Symbionts: What Have We Learnt?
TLDR
Experimental evolution provided new insights into rhizobium biology and evolution and showed that post-infection sanctions allowed the increase in frequency of nitrogen-fixing variants among a non- fixing population in the M. pudica–C. Expand
Current Status of the Taxonomy of Bacteria Able to Establish Nitrogen-Fixing Legume Symbiosis
TLDR
This chapter reviews the different groups of bacteria able of forming symbiosis with legumes and their classification based on core genes (genera and species) as well as on auxiliary ones (symbiovars). Expand
From β- to α-proteobacteria: the origin and evolution of rhizobial nodulation genes nodIJ.
TLDR
The exhaustive phylogenetic analysis showed that the entire nodIJ clade is included in the clade of Burkholderiaceae DRA-ATPase/permease genes, that is, the nodIJ genes originated from gene duplication in a lineage of the β-proteobacterial family. Expand
Biodiversity of Mimosa pudica rhizobial symbionts (Cupriavidus taiwanensis, Rhizobium mesoamericanum) in New Caledonia and their adaptation to heavy metal-rich soils.
TLDR
The diversity of M. pudica symbionts in the island of New Caledonia, which is characterized by soils with high heavy metal content, especially of Ni, is described and specific metal tolerance marker genes were found in the genomes of these Symbionts, and their origin was investigated by phylogenetic analyses. Expand
Insights into the history of the legume‐betaproteobacterial symbiosis
TLDR
It is revealed that not only are these newly identified rhizobia novel in shifting the paradigm of the authors' understanding of legume symbiosis, but also, based on symbiotic gene phylogenies, have a history that is both ancient and stable. Expand
Specificity in Legume-Rhizobia Symbioses
TLDR
Strain-specific legume rhizobia symbioses can develop in particular habitats and are likely to be at least in part related to the relative occurrence of the potential symbionts in soils of the different regions. Expand
The Symbiotic Plasmids of the Rhizobiaceae
TLDR
This research showed, almost from the start, the existence of novel forms of genome organization in prokaryotes, such as the finding of multiple large plasmids, and control by quorum-sensing systems has dominated the study of conjugation in the Rhizobiaceae. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 32 REFERENCES
Nodulation of legumes by members of the β-subclass of Proteobacteria
TLDR
The identification of proteobacteria from the β-subclass that nodulate legumes shows that the ability to establish a symbiosis with legumes is more widespread in bacteria than anticipated to date. Expand
Methylotrophic MethylobacteriumBacteria Nodulate and Fix Nitrogen in Symbiosis with Legumes
TLDR
The discovery of a fourth rhizobial branch involving bacteria of the Methylobacterium genus is reported, which is closely related to Bradyrhizobium NodA, suggesting that this gene was acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Expand
Phylogenetic analyses of symbiotic nodulation genes support vertical and lateral gene co-transfer within the Bradyrhizobium genus.
TLDR
PCR amplification, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of nodA gene sequences revealed the monophyletic character with the possible exception of photosynthetic Bradyrhizobium, despite high sequence diversity, and indicated that the spread and maintenance of nodulation genes within the Bradyrnobia genus occurred through vertical transmission, although lateral gene transfer also played a significant role. Expand
Identification and structure of the Rhizobium galegae common nodulation genes: evidence for horizontal gene transfer.
TLDR
Analysis of DNA sequence data and phylogenetic analyses indicate that lateral nod gene transfer occurred from fast-growing rhizobia toward agrobacteria, after which the symbiotic apparatus evolved under host plant constraint. Expand
The Common Nodulation Genes of Astragalus sinicus Rhizobia Are Conserved despite Chromosomal Diversity
TLDR
Data indicate that, whereas microsymbionts of A. sinicus exhibit chromosomal diversity, their nodulation genes are conserved, supporting the hypothesis of horizontal transfer of nod genes among diverse recipient bacteria. Expand
Nodulation of Mimosa spp. by the β-proteobacterium Ralstonia taiwanensis
TLDR
Ralstonia taiwanensis LMG19424, which was originally isolated from Mimosa pudica nodules, was transformed to carry the green fluorescent protein (gfp) reporter gene before being used to inoculate axenically-grown seedlings of M. diplotricha. Expand
Rhizobium Phylogenies and Bacterial Genetic Diversity
TLDR
Gene maps, genome sizes, and sequence of metabolic genes would serve to validate the present Rhizobium and Bradyrhizobia phylogenies and more realistic phylogenies should perhaps consider lateral transfer between clusters of bacteria. Expand
The Composite Genome of the Legume Symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti
TLDR
The annotated DNA sequence of the α-proteobacteriumSinorhizobium meliloti, the symbiont of alfalfa, is presented, indicating that all three elements contribute, in varying degrees, to symbiosis and reveals how this genome may have emerged during evolution. Expand
Molecular Basis of Symbiotic Promiscuity
TLDR
It is suggested that restricted host ranges are limited to specific niches and represent specialization of widespread and more ancestral promiscuous symbioses. Expand
Molecular Evolutionary Systematics of the Rhizobiaceae
TLDR
Not all members of the Fabaceae nodulate and a majority of the different species have not been systematically examined for nodulation, while nodulation is predominant among species within the subfamilies Mimosoideae and Papilionoideae. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...