Legalised non-consensual sterilisation – eugenics put into practice before 1945, and the aftermath. Part 1: USA, Japan, Canada and Mexico

@article{Amy2018LegalisedNS,
  title={Legalised non-consensual sterilisation – eugenics put into practice before 1945, and the aftermath. Part 1: USA, Japan, Canada and Mexico},
  author={J. J. Amy and Sam Rowlands},
  journal={The European Journal of Contraception \& Reproductive Health Care},
  year={2018},
  volume={23},
  pages={121 - 129}
}
  • J. Amy, S. Rowlands
  • Published 2018
  • Medicine
  • The European Journal of Contraception & Reproductive Health Care
Abstract In the late 19th century, eugenics, a pseudo-scientific doctrine based on an erroneous interpretation of the laws of heredity, swept across the industrialised world. Academics and other influential figures who promoted it convinced political stakeholders to enact laws authorising the sterilisation of people seen as ‘social misfits’. The earliest sterilisation Act was enforced in Indiana, in 1907; most states in the USA followed suit and so did several countries, with dissimilar… Expand
Legalised non-consensual sterilisation – eugenics put into practice before 1945, and the aftermath. Part 2: Europe
  • J. Amy, S. Rowlands
  • Medicine
  • The European journal of contraception & reproductive health care : the official journal of the European Society of Contraception
  • 2018
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