Legal and ethical aspects of refusing medical treatment after a suicide attempt: the Wooltorton case in the Australian context

@article{Ryan2010LegalAE,
  title={Legal and ethical aspects of refusing medical treatment after a suicide attempt: the Wooltorton case in the Australian context},
  author={C. Ryan and S. Callaghan},
  journal={Medical Journal of Australia},
  year={2010},
  volume={193}
}
When a patient presents to hospital after a suicide attempt and appears to refuse treatment, clinicians should first assess if he or she should be treated under mental health legislation, regardless of competence to refuse treatment. When it is not possible or is inappropriate to treat under mental health legislation, the person's competence to refuse treatment should be assessed. If the patient is definitely competent, his or her decision to refuse treatment should probably be honoured. If an… Expand
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