Lefties Get It Right When Hearing Tool Sounds

@article{Lewis2006LeftiesGI,
  title={Lefties Get It Right When Hearing Tool Sounds},
  author={JamesW. Lewis and Raymond E. Phinney and Julie A. Brefczynski-Lewis and Edgar A. DeYoe},
  journal={Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
  year={2006},
  volume={18},
  pages={1314-1330}
}
Our ability to manipulate and understand the use of a wide range of tools is a feature that sets humans apart from other animals. In right-handers, we previously reported that hearing hand-manipulated tool sounds preferentially activates a left hemisphere network of motor-related brain regions hypothesized to be related to handedness. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared cortical activation in strongly right-handed versus left-handed listeners categorizing tool sounds… 
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Cortical Networks Related to Human Use of Tools
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This review compares and summarizes results from 64 paradigms published over the past decade that have examined cortical regions associated with tool use skills and tool knowledge and revealed cortical networks in both hemispheres, though with a clear left hemisphere bias.
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