Left-handedness as a risk factor for fractures

@article{Luetters2003LefthandednessAA,
  title={Left-handedness as a risk factor for fractures},
  author={Crystal M. Luetters and Jennifer Kelsey and Theresa H. M. Keegan and Charles P. Quesenberry and Stephen Sidney},
  journal={Osteoporosis International},
  year={2003},
  volume={14},
  pages={918-922}
}
Left-handedness has been associated with increased fracture risk in a small number of previous studies. This study reports risks for fractures at the proximal humerus, distal forearm, pelvis, foot, and shaft of the tibia/fibula according to handedness in a case-control study conducted from October 1996 to May 2001 among members of Northern California Kaiser Permanente. Handedness was assessed by questionnaire for 2,841 cases and 2,192 controls, and subjects were categorized as left-handed… 
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