Left-Libertarianism, Market Anarchism, Class Conflict and Historical Theories of Distributive Justice

@article{Long2012LeftLibertarianismMA,
  title={Left-Libertarianism, Market Anarchism, Class Conflict and Historical Theories of Distributive Justice},
  author={Roderick T. Long},
  journal={Griffith Law Review},
  year={2012},
  volume={21},
  pages={413 - 431}
}
  • R. Long
  • Published 1 January 2012
  • Economics
  • Griffith Law Review
A frequent objection to the ‘historical’ (in Nozick’s sense) approach to distributive justice is that it serves to legitimate existing massive inequalities of wealth. It is argued that, on the contrary, the historical approach, thanks to its fit with the market anarchist theory of class conflict, represents a far more effective tool for challenging these inequalities than do relatively end-oriented approaches such as utilitarianism and Rawlsianism. 

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