Learning to read: an unnatural act

@article{Gough1980LearningTR,
  title={Learning to read: an unnatural act},
  author={P. Gough and M. Hillinger},
  journal={Bulletin of the Orton Society},
  year={1980},
  volume={30},
  pages={179-196}
}
The six-year-old's sight is as good as the adult's (Amigo 1972), and his hearing is nearly so (Elliott and Katz 1980). The child has an excellent memory (Mandler, in press), and his learning ability is remarkable. Even a conservative estimate of the size of his vocabulary will show that he must have learned, on average, more than four new words every day since his first birthday (Carey 1978). He has already learned to speak and understand his native language with remarkable fluency. The average… Expand
Introduction to the special issue on cognitive science of text
How children learn to read and why they fail
  • P. Gough
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Annals of dyslexia
  • 1996
How does orthographic learning happen
Development of the ability to read words: Update.
Two Paradoxes of Phonics.
Children's use of analogy in reading and spelling
Young Children Use Letter Names in Learning to Read Words
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