Learning to live with the pain: acceptance of pain predicts adjustment in persons with chronic pain

@article{McCracken1998LearningTL,
  title={Learning to live with the pain: acceptance of pain predicts adjustment in persons with chronic pain},
  author={Lance M. McCracken},
  journal={Pain},
  year={1998},
  volume={74},
  pages={21-27}
}
When patients find their pain unacceptable they are likely to attempt to avoid it at all costs and seek readily available interventions to reduce or eliminate it. [...] Key Method One hundred and sixty adults with chronic pain provided responses to a questionnaire assessing acceptance of pain, and a number of other questionnaires assessing their adjustment to pain. Correlational analyses showed that greater acceptance of pain was associated with reports of lower pain intensity, less pain-related anxiety and…Expand
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