Learning to listen to trans and gender diverse children: A Response to Zucker (2018) and Steensma and Cohen-Kettenis (2018)

@article{Winters2018LearningTL,
  title={Learning to listen to trans and gender diverse children: A Response to Zucker (2018) and Steensma and Cohen-Kettenis (2018)},
  author={Kelley Winters and Julia Temple Newhook and Jake Pyne and Stephen Feder and Ally Jamieson and Cindy Holmes and Mari-Lynne Sinnott and Sarah Pickett and Jemma Tosh},
  journal={International Journal of Transgenderism},
  year={2018},
  volume={19},
  pages={246 - 250}
}
ABSTRACT The authors answer recent responses by Steensma & Cohen-Kettenis (2018) and Zucker (2018) to our critical commentary on “desistance” stereotypes and their underlying research on trans and gender diverse children (Temple Newhook et al., 2018). We provide clarification in the following areas: (1) the scope of our paper; (2) our support of longitudinal studies; (3) consequences of harm to trans and gender diverse children; (4) clinical practice implications; (5) concerns about validity of… 

Transgender youth are strong: Resilience among gender expansive youth worldwide

Transgender youth are strong: Resilience among gender expansive youth worldwide Ryan J Watson & Jaimie Veale To cite this article: Ryan J Watson & Jaimie Veale (2018) Transgender youth are strong:

Homophobia, conversion therapy, and care models for trans youth: defending the gender-affirmative approach

Abstract In recent years, opponents of the gender-affirmative approach to trans youth have argued that it bears homophobic roots and may be tantamount to conversion therapy. This argument is

Family-Based Interventions with Transgender and Gender Expansive Youth: Systematic Review and Best Practice Recommendations

Research on transgender and gender expansive (TGE) youth has highlighted the disproportionate and challenging mental health and developmental outcomes faced by these young people. Research also lar...

Defining Desistance: Exploring Desistance in Transgender and Gender Expansive Youth Through Systematic Literature Review

Background: Desistance is a concept that has been poorly defined in the literature, yet greatly impacts the arguments for and against providing gender-affirming care for transgender and gender expa...

A Critical Review of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Care of Transgender and Gender Diverse Children and Youth for Use by Primary Care Practitioners

TLDR
Examining and critique international clinical practice guidelines related to transgender and gender diverse children and youth and assessing the applicability of the guidelines to ...

Foreword

This special issue continues an ongoing process of thinking and doing trans legal studies in Canada. The project started with a panel, “On theMargins of Trans Legal Change,” organized at the Law and

Über die Angst vor der Ansteckung und die Pathologisierung geschlechtlicher Non‑Konformität

In Fragen von trans* lässt sich seit einigen Jahren eine emotionale Debatte beobachten, die ihre Wirkmächtigkeit nicht nur innerhalb der psychotherapeutischen Profession entfaltet. Die Emotionalität

Standards of Care for the Health of Transgender and Gender Diverse People, Version 8

School Cultures and Trans and Gender-diverse Children: Parents' Perspectives

Abstract In the United Kingdom, trans and gender-diverse children are increasingly visible within the school system. We examined data obtained from 23 parents who are supportive of their trans and

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 38 REFERENCES

The myth of persistence: Response to “A critical commentary on follow-up studies and ‘desistance’ theories about transgender and gender non-conforming children” by Temple Newhook et al. (2018)

ABSTRACT Temple Newhook et al. (2018) provide a critique of recent follow-up studies of children referred to specialized gender identity clinics, organized around rates of persistence and desistance.

A critical commentary on “A critical commentary on follow-up studies and “desistence” theories about transgender and gender non-conforming children”

The article entitled “A critical commentary on followup studies and “desistence” theories about transgender and gender non-conforming children” by Temple Newhook et al. (2018) is a plea to abandon

A critical commentary on follow-up studies and “desistance” theories about transgender and gender-nonconforming children

ABSTRACT Background: It has been widely suggested that over 80% of transgender children will come to identify as cisgender (i.e., desist) as they mature, with the assumption that for this 80%, the

Psychosexual outcome of gender-dysphoric children.

TLDR
Both boys and girls in the persistence group were more extremely cross-gendered in behavior and feelings and were more likely to fulfill gender identity disorder (GID) criteria in childhood than the children in the other two groups.

Factors associated with desistence and persistence of childhood gender dysphoria: a quantitative follow-up study.

Clinical Management of Gender Dysphoria in Children and Adolescents: The Dutch Approach

The Dutch approach on clinical management of both prepubertal children under the age of 12 and adolescents starting at age 12 with gender dysphoria, starts with a thorough assessment of any

Gender Transitioning before Puberty?

TLDR
It is found that the persistence rate of GID is about 15.8% (39 out of the 246 children who were reported on in the literature) (for an overview, see Steensma, Biemond, deBoer, & Cohen-Kettenis, 2011), and that a more likely psy-chosexual outcome in adulthood is a homosexual sexual ori-entation without genderdysphoria.

A follow-up study of girls with gender identity disorder.

TLDR
The rates of GID persistence and bisexual/homosexual sexual orientation were substantially higher than base rates in the general female population derived from epidemiological or survey studies and there was some evidence of a "dosage" effect, with girls who were more cross-sex typed in their childhood behavior more likely to be gender dysphoric at follow-up and to have been classified as bisexual/Homosexual in behavior.

The "Sissy Boy Syndrome" and the Development of Homosexuality.

In undergoing this life, many people always try to do and get the best. New knowledge, experience, lesson, and everything that can improve the life will be done. However, many people sometimes feel

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders