Learning to label letters by sounds or names: a comparison of England and the United States.

@article{Ellefson2009LearningTL,
  title={Learning to label letters by sounds or names: a comparison of England and the United States.},
  author={Michelle R. Ellefson and Rebecca Treiman and Brett Kessler},
  journal={Journal of experimental child psychology},
  year={2009},
  volume={102 3},
  pages={
          323-41
        }
}
Learning about letters is an important foundation for literacy development. Should children be taught to label letters by conventional names, such as /bi/ for b, or by sounds, such as /b/? We queried parents and teachers, finding that those in the United States stress letter names with young children, whereas those in England begin with sounds. Looking at 5- to 7-year-olds in the two countries, we found that U.S. children were better at providing the names of letters than were English children… CONTINUE READING
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