Learning to fear and cope with a natural stressor: individually and socially acquired corticosterone and avoidance responses to biting flies

@article{Kavaliers2003LearningTF,
  title={Learning to fear and cope with a natural stressor: individually and socially acquired corticosterone and avoidance responses to biting flies},
  author={M. Kavaliers and D. Colwell and E. Choleris},
  journal={Hormones and Behavior},
  year={2003},
  volume={43},
  pages={99-107}
}
Animals learn to recognize and respond to a variety of dangerous factors, with biting and blood-feeding flies being among the most prevalent of natural stressors. Here we describe the behavioral avoidance and hormonal (corticosterone) stress responses to biting fly exposure and the roles of individual and social learning in the acquisition of these fear-associated responses. Male mice exposed to a single 30-min session of attack by intact biting flies (stable fly, Stomoxys calcitrans L… Expand
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