Learning how to live together: genomic insights into prokaryote–animal symbioses

@article{Moya2008LearningHT,
  title={Learning how to live together: genomic insights into prokaryote–animal symbioses},
  author={Andr{\'e}s Moya and Juli Peret{\'o} and Rosario Gil and Amparo Latorre},
  journal={Nature Reviews Genetics},
  year={2008},
  volume={9},
  pages={218-229}
}
Our understanding of prokaryote–eukaryote symbioses as a source of evolutionary innovation has been rapidly increased by the advent of genomics, which has made possible the biological study of uncultivable endosymbionts. Genomics is allowing the dissection of the evolutionary process that starts with host invasion then progresses from facultative to obligate symbiosis and ends with replacement by, or coexistence with, new symbionts. Moreover, genomics has provided important clues on the… Expand
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