Learning how to "make a deal": human (Homo sapiens) and monkey (Macaca mulatta) performance when repeatedly faced with the Monty Hall Dilemma.

@article{Klein2013LearningHT,
  title={Learning how to "make a deal": human (Homo sapiens) and monkey (Macaca mulatta) performance when repeatedly faced with the Monty Hall Dilemma.},
  author={Emily D. Klein and Theodore Avery Evans and Natasha B. Schultz and Michael Beran},
  journal={Journal of comparative psychology},
  year={2013},
  volume={127 1},
  pages={103-8}
}
The Monty Hall Dilemma (MHD) is a well-known probability puzzle in which players try to guess which of three doors conceals a prize. After selecting a door, players are shown that there is no prize behind one of the remaining doors. Players then are given a choice to stay with their door or switch to the other unopened door. Most people stay, even though switching doubles the probability of winning. The MHD offers one of the clearest examples of irrational choice behavior in humans. The present… CONTINUE READING

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