Learners’ choices and beliefs about self-testing

@article{Kornell2009LearnersCA,
  title={Learners’ choices and beliefs about self-testing},
  author={Nate Kornell and Lisa K. Son},
  journal={Memory},
  year={2009},
  volume={17},
  pages={493 - 501}
}
Students have to make scores of practical decisions when they study. We investigated the effectiveness of, and beliefs underlying, one such practical decision: the decision to test oneself while studying. Using a flashcards-like procedure, participants studied lists of word pairs. On the second of two study trials, participants either saw the entire pair again (pair mode) or saw the cue and attempted to generate the target (test mode). Participants were asked either to rate the effectiveness of… Expand
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