Leaf-swallowing in Nigerian chimpanzees: evidence for assumed self-medication

@article{Fowler2006LeafswallowingIN,
  title={Leaf-swallowing in Nigerian chimpanzees: evidence for assumed self-medication},
  author={Andrew Fowler and Yianna Koutsioni and Volker Sommer},
  journal={Primates},
  year={2006},
  volume={48},
  pages={73-76}
}
A field study in Gashaka, Nigeria, adds the fourth subspecies of chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes vellerosus, to the list of African ape populations in which leaf-swallowing occurs. Unchewed herbaceous leaves of Desmodium gangeticum (Leguminosae-Papilionoideae) were recovered in 4% of 299 faecal samples of wild chimpanzees and clumps of sharp-edged grass leaves in 2%. The ingestion is believed to serve self-medicatory purposes because the leaves had a rough surface or were sharp-edged (which could… Expand
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