Leaf phenology of some mid-Cretaceous polar forests, Alexander Island, Antarctica

@article{FalconLang2001LeafPO,
  title={Leaf phenology of some mid-Cretaceous polar forests, Alexander Island, Antarctica},
  author={H. Falcon-Lang and David J Cantrill},
  journal={Geological Magazine},
  year={2001},
  volume={138},
  pages={39 - 52}
}
The leaf longevity and seasonal timing of leaf abscission within a plant community is closely related to climate, a phenomenon referred to as leaf phenology. In this paper the leaf phenology of some mid-Cretaceous (late Albian) forests which grew at latitude of 75° S on Alexander Island, Antarctica, is analysed. Five independent techniques for determining leaf longevity are applied to the fossil remains of each of the canopy-forming trees. These techniques utilize: (1) the anatomical character… Expand
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