Lead hazards for pregnant women and children: part 1: immigrants and the poor shoulder most of the burden of lead exposure in this country. Part 1 of a two-part article details how exposure happens, whom it affects, and the harm it can do.

Abstract

Poor, urban, and immigrant populations are at far greater risk for lead exposure than are other groups in the United States. Children with even slightly elevated blood lead levels are at increased risk for significant neurobehavioral problems that can extend through adolescence. Research has shown that elevated blood lead levels in pregnant women, even… (More)
DOI: 10.1097/01.NAJ.0000337736.76730.66

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Cite this paper

@article{Cleveland2008LeadHF, title={Lead hazards for pregnant women and children: part 1: immigrants and the poor shoulder most of the burden of lead exposure in this country. Part 1 of a two-part article details how exposure happens, whom it affects, and the harm it can do.}, author={Lisa Marie Cleveland and Monica L Minter and Kathleen A Cobb and Anthony A Scott and Victor F. German}, journal={The American journal of nursing}, year={2008}, volume={108 10}, pages={40-9; quiz 50} }