• Corpus ID: 30541294

Lead and Arsenic in Morchella esculenta Fruitbodies Collected in Lead Arsenate Contaminated Apple Orchards in the Northeastern United States : A Preliminary Study

@inproceedings{ShavitLeadAA,
  title={Lead and Arsenic in Morchella esculenta Fruitbodies Collected in Lead Arsenate Contaminated Apple Orchards in the Northeastern United States : A Preliminary Study},
  author={Efrat Shavit}
}
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2 A few months ago the New York Mycological Society lost a very good friend. Bill (Wilbur K. Williams) was a dear friend of mine. In the months before his death we had conversations on many issues
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