Laying Eggs in a Neighbor's Nest: Benefit and Cost of Colonial Nesting in Swallows

@article{Brown1984LayingEI,
  title={Laying Eggs in a Neighbor's Nest: Benefit and Cost of Colonial Nesting in Swallows},
  author={C R Brown},
  journal={Science},
  year={1984},
  volume={224},
  pages={518 - 519}
}
  • C. R. Brown
  • Published 4 May 1984
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Science
Intraspecific brood parasitism (laying eggs in another's nest) occurs widely in colonial cliff swallows (Passeriformes: Hirundinidae: Hirundo pyrrhonota). In colonies consisting of more than ten nests, up to 24 percent of the nests were sometimes parasitized by colony members. Laying eggs in a conspecific's nest may be a benefit of coloniality for parasitic individuals and simultaneously may represent a cost to host individuals within the same colony. 
Laying eggs in others' nests: Intraspecific brood parasitism in birds.
A new form of reproductive parasitism in cliff swallows
TLDR
It is discovered that colonial cliff swallows (Hirundo pyrrhonota) not only lay eggs in other individuals' nests, but also physically transfer eggs between nests after the eggs are laid.
An assessment of possible intraspecific brood parasitism in ring-billed gulls
TLDR
It is presented evidence that some odd-coloured eggs were laid by females that parasitized nests, and significantly greater variability in egg dimensions and egg shape, lower fertility, and atypical laying intervals in mixed-colour clutches suggest that more than one female laid eggs in mixed -coloured clutches.
LAYING PLASTICITY IN AN AVIAN BROOD PARASITE
TLDR
The result differs from previous data on conspecific brood parasitism in this (and other) avian species and suggests that sitespecific ecological conditions exert differing selective influences on the behavioral development of populations.
The costs and benefits of egg destruction by conspecifics in colonial cliff swallows
TLDR
Study of egg destruction by conspecifics in colonial Cliff Swallows in southwestern Nebraska found that nests with egg destruction were over 3 times more likely than nests in general to have an egg physically transferred into them, representing a definite cost of coloniality.
High frequency of conspecific brood parasitism in a colonial waterbird, the Eared Grebe Podiceps nigricollis
TLDR
Egg loss was more common at parasitized nests than unparasitized nests, but further studies are needed to confirm whether this is due to egg rejection by hosts, and a comparison of clutch size information collected 40 years ago indicates that parasitism may be a regular feature of Eared Grebe reproduction.
Frequency, timing and costs of intraspecific nest parasitism in the common eider
TLDR
Intraspecific nest parasitism was studied in the Hudson Bay race of the Common Eider, near Churchill, Manitoba, and it was determined that 42.4% of completed clutches were parasitized.
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