Law, Responsibility, and the Brain

@article{Mobbs2007LawRA,
  title={Law, Responsibility, and the Brain},
  author={Dean Mobbs and Hakwan C. Lau and Owen D Jones and Chris D. Frith},
  journal={PLoS Biology},
  year={2007},
  volume={5}
}
Brain-imaging studies have reinvigorated the neurophilosophical and legal debate of whether we are free agents in control of our own actions or mere prisoners of a biologically determined brain. 
Neuroscience and Law: The Evidentiary Value of Brain Imaging
Graduate Student Journal of Psychology Copyright 2009 by the Department of Counseling & Clinical Psychology 2009, Vol. 11 Teachers College, Columbia University
Neuroscience and Law: Australia
The Australian legal system has not been receptive to new neuroscientific technology. Current case law and legislative provisions demonstrate the hurdles imposed by the rigorous admissibility
Neuroethics/Brain Imaging
The ability to produce images of the structural and functional landscape of the human brain has resulted from the combined work of radiology and the clinical neurosciences of neurology, neurosurgery,
Neuroimaging, Uncertainty, and the Problem of Dispositions
  • G. Arnason
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics
  • 2010
Brain research in neuroscience and related fields is changing our understanding of the brain and its relation to the mind and to human behavior, giving a new impetus to the problem of free will and
Neuroimaging and Criminal Law
Methods of neuroimaging have sporadically, though in recent years increasingly, occurred in legal proceedings. By now, however, it seems that they are about to enter courtrooms on a systematic basis.
‘Screen and intervene’: governing risky brains
  • N. Rose
  • Psychology, Medicine
    History of the human sciences
  • 2010
TLDR
It is argued that a new diagram is emerging in the criminal justice system as it encounters developments in the neurosciences, developing around the themes of susceptibility, risk, pre-emption and precaution.
The Law's Use of Brain Evidence
This review examines how advances in neuroscience are affecting civil law, criminal law, and law enforcement. Brain imaging techniques have already been used to detect brain injury, assess pain, and
Brains in context in the neurolaw debate: the examples of free will and "dangerous" brains.
  • Stephan Schleim
  • Psychology, Medicine
    International journal of law and psychiatry
  • 2012
TLDR
Concerns are raised that applying neuroscience methods about an individual's responsibility or dangerousness is premature at the present time and carries serious individual and societal risks.
On the Stand. Another Episode of Neuroscience and Law Discussion From Italy
After three proceedings in which neuroscience was a relevant factor for the final verdict in Italian courts, for the first time a recent case puts in question the legal relevance of neuroscientific
Law and Cognitive Neuroscience
Law and neuroscience (sometimes neurolaw) has become a recognized field of study. The advances of neuroscience are proving useful in solving some perennial challenges of legal scholarship and are
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 89 REFERENCES
Into the mind of a killer
TLDR
Brain imaging studies are starting to venture into the legal minefield of research into criminal psychopathy, according to researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles.
The neurobiology of cognition
Perhaps the deepest mysteries facing the natural sciences concern the higher functions of the central nervous system. Understanding how the brain gives rise to mental experiences looms as one of the
The Psychopathology of Crime: Criminal Behavior as a Clinical Disorder
Crime and the nature of psychopathology crime in the context of evolution genetics neurochemistry neuropsychology brain imaging. psychophysiology. other biological factors head injury pregnancy and
The frontal cortex and the criminal justice system.
  • R. Sapolsky
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
  • 2004
TLDR
The role of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in cognition, emotional regulation, control of impulsive behaviour and moral reasoning is focused on, and the consequences of PFC damage on these endpoints are reviewed.
Ventromedial frontal lobe trauma
TLDR
A 33-year-old man attempted suicide with a crossbow, injuring his left ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and was docile, indifferent to his situation, and inappropriately cheerful afterward.
Brain Overclaim Syndrome and Criminal Responsibility: A Diagnostic Note
This brief diagnostic note identifies a cognitive pathology, Brain Overclaim Syndrome [BOS], that often afflicts those inflamed by the fascinating new discoveries in the neurosciences. It begins by
The Ethical Brain.
Impairment of social and moral behavior related to early damage in human prefrontal cortex
TLDR
Early-onset prefrontal damage resulted in a syndrome resembling psychopathy, suggesting that the acquisition of complex social conventions and moral rules had been impaired.
Behavioural and functional anatomical correlates of deception in humans
TLDR
Lying was associated with longer response times and greater activity in bilateral ventrolateral prefrontal cortices and Ventrolateral cortex may be engaged in generating lies or withholding the truth.
fMRI in the public eye
The wide dissemination and expanding applications of functional MRI have not escaped the attention of the media or discussion in the wider public arena. From the bench to the bedside, this technology
...
1
2
3
4
5
...