Latrodectism: a prospective cohort study of bites by formally identified redback spiders

@article{Isbister2003LatrodectismAP,
  title={Latrodectism: a prospective cohort study of bites by formally identified redback spiders},
  author={Geoffrey K. Isbister and Michael R. Gray},
  journal={Medical Journal of Australia},
  year={2003},
  volume={179}
}
Objective: To determine the spectrum of severity and early diagnostic predictors of redback spider bites (Latrodectus hasselti ), and to examine the effect of intramuscular redback antivenom. 
White‐tail spider bite: a prospective study of 130 definite bites by Lampona species
TLDR
The circumstances and clinical effects of bites by white‐tail spiders, including the two species Lampona cylindrata and L. murina commonly encountered by humans, and the incidence of necrotic lesions are investigated. Expand
Latrodectism in New Caledonia: First Report of Presumed Redback Spider (Latrodectus hasselti) Envenomation
TLDR
This case of presumed redback spider envenomation observed near Noumea in New Caledonia is the first local reported case in this archipelago, where L. hasselti is currently considered a native species. Expand
Route of administration of redback spider bite antivenom: Determining clinician beliefs to facilitate Bayesian analysis of a clinical trial
Objective:  To determine current beliefs of Australasian emergency physicians, to form the basis of ‘stopping rules’ for a clinical trial of intravenous (i.v.) versus intramuscular (i.m.) redbackExpand
Latrodectism: case report of a katipo spider (Latrodectus katipo) bite and review of the literature.
We describe the case of a 29-year-old man who was bitten on the leg by a katipo spider, a relative of the Australian redback and American black widow spiders, while camping in sand dunes at MahangaExpand
Definition , clinical features and epidemiology An approach to the diagnosis of suspected and definite spider bites Definite spider bites Case studies INSIDE Suspected spider bite
  • 2004
Suspected spider bite Dr Geoff Isbister, emergency physician and clinical toxicologist, Newcastle Mater Misericordiae Hospital; clinical pharmacologist, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, NSW;Expand
A double‐blind, randomized trial of intravenous versus intramuscular antivenom for Red‐back spider envenoming
Objective:  To compare the efficacy of intravenous versus intramuscular antivenom (AV) in the treatment of Red‐back spider (RBS) envenoming.
A prospective study of definite bites by spiders of the family Sparassidae (huntsmen spiders) with identification to species level.
  • G. Isbister, D. Hirst
  • Medicine
  • Toxicon : official journal of the International Society on Toxinology
  • 2003
TLDR
Bites by sparassid spiders cause minor effects, characterised by immediate and transient pain, associated with bleeding, puncture marks and local redness, and the mechanism of effects appeared to be trauma rather than envenoming. Expand
Spider bite--the redback spider and its relatives.
TLDR
The key presenting features of redback spider envenomation are described and treatment for bites by this spider and that of its close relatives, the cupboard spider are discussed. Expand
Australian immigrant of the arachnid variety?
TLDR
The case report of a patient diagnosed with a spider bite, thought due to an Australian (White-Tailed) spider unintentionally imported in a traveller's luggage is described. Expand
Clinical consequences of spider bites: recent advances in our understanding.
  • G. Isbister, Julian White
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Toxicon : official journal of the International Society on Toxinology
  • 2004
TLDR
Most spiders only cause minor effects, including a large number of groups that have been implicated in necrotic arachnidism, including the widow spiders, recluse spiders and some mygalomorph spiders. Expand
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The circumstances and clinical effects of bites by white‐tail spiders, including the two species Lampona cylindrata and L. murina commonly encountered by humans, and the incidence of necrotic lesions are investigated. Expand
Venoms of Theridiidae, Genus Latrodectus
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He was the first to prove the relationship between the bite of this species and the syndrome of “latrodectism,” which had been confused up to that time with the hysteria form known as “tarantism” (see Part B). Expand
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The aim of this study was to describe the pattern of illness caused by red‐back spider bites to children in Perth, Western Australia, over a 10 year period, and to compare it with that in adults. TheExpand
Survey of 2144 Cases of Red‐Back Spider Bites: Australia and New Zealand, 1963‐1976
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An analysis has been made of 2144 consecutive cases of latrodectism (envenomation by the redback spider, Latrodectus mactans hasselti) reported to the Commonwealth Serum Laboratories, finding local pain, redness and swelling were the most common symptoms. Expand
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There appears to be extensive cross‐reactivity of species‐specific widow spider antivenom within the family Theridiidae, and Sydney funnel‐web antivenoms has been shown to be effective in the treatment of mouse spider envenomation. Expand
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TLDR
Four cases of Red-back spider envenoming are reported in which there was minimal response to intramuscular antivenom, raising the question of its efficacy. Expand
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Although calcium gluconate usually has been considered the first-line treatment of severe envenomations by black widow spiders, it was found to be ineffective for pain relief compared with a combination of IV opioids and benzodiazepines. Expand
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TLDR
The results suggest that the WA red‐ back spider is particularly venomous, and that the annual number of definite red‐back spider‐bites in Australia lies between approximately 830 and 1950 cases. Expand
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