Latin and Greek Christians

@inproceedings{Kolbaba2008LatinAG,
  title={Latin and Greek Christians},
  author={Tia M. Kolbaba},
  year={2008}
}
At the end of Late Antiquity, when this chapter begins, the Alps were a Great Divide between Mediterranean cultures and transalpine ones; Rome and Constantinople had more in common with one another than either did with Germanic groups in the north. The emperors in Constantinople still wielded enough authority in Rome to arrest popes who resisted their policies, and the papal apokrisiarios at the imperial court was an important figure in Rome. But by 1100 the popes themselves often came from… 
41 Citations
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