Lateralization of response to social stimuli in fishes: A comparison between different methods and species

@article{Sovrano2001LateralizationOR,
  title={Lateralization of response to social stimuli in fishes: A comparison between different methods and species},
  author={Valeria Anna Sovrano and Angelo Bisazza and Giorgio Vallortigara},
  journal={Physiology \& Behavior},
  year={2001},
  volume={74},
  pages={237-244}
}

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