Laterality in stride pattern preferences in racehorses

@article{Williams2007LateralityIS,
  title={Laterality in stride pattern preferences in racehorses},
  author={D. Williams and B. J. Norris},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2007},
  volume={74},
  pages={941-950}
}
During performance, racehorses gallop in an asymmetrical stride with either the left hindhoof striking the ground first (right lead stride pattern) or the right hindhoof striking the ground first (left lead stride pattern). In this study we examined racehorses for a stride pattern preference. Here, we showed that racehorses do have a preference for one stride pattern over the other. Across thoroughbreds, Arabians, and American Quarter horses 90% preferred their right lead stride pattern with 10… Expand
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