Lateralisation of predator avoidance responses in three species of toads

@article{Lippolis2002LateralisationOP,
  title={Lateralisation of predator avoidance responses in three species of toads},
  author={Giuseppe Lippolis and Angelo Bisazza and Lesley J. Rogers and Giorgio Vallortigara},
  journal={Laterality},
  year={2002},
  volume={7},
  pages={163 - 183}
}
Lateralisation of responses to presentation of a simulated predator was investigated in three species of toads: two European species (the common toad, Bufo bufo, and the green toad, Bufo viridis) and one species introduced to Australia from South America, the cane toad Bufo marinus. First a simulated snake was presented moving rapidly towards the toad in the frontal field of vision and the toad's escape responses, including jumps to the right and to the left, were recorded. No significant bias… Expand
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