Lateralisation of aggressive displays in a tephritid fly

@article{Benelli2014LateralisationOA,
  title={Lateralisation of aggressive displays in a tephritid fly},
  author={G. Benelli and Elisa Donati and Donato Romano and C. Stefanini and R. Messing and A. Canale},
  journal={The Science of Nature},
  year={2014},
  volume={102},
  pages={1-9}
}
Lateralisation (i.e. different functional and/or structural specialisations of the left and right sides of the brain) of aggression has been examined in several vertebrate species, while evidence for invertebrates is scarce. In this study, we investigated lateralisation of aggressive displays (boxing with forelegs and wing strikes) in the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata. We attempted to answer the following questions: (1) do medflies show lateralisation of aggressive displays at the… Expand
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