Late rapid deterioration after endoscopic third ventriculostomy: additional cases and review of the literature.

@article{Drake2006LateRD,
  title={Late rapid deterioration after endoscopic third ventriculostomy: additional cases and review of the literature.},
  author={James M. Drake and Paul Chumas and John Kestle and Alain Pierre-Kahn and Matthieu Vinchon and Jennifer I.M. Brown and Ian F. Pollack and H. Arai},
  journal={Journal of neurosurgery},
  year={2006},
  volume={105 2 Suppl},
  pages={
          118-26
        }
}
OBJECT Late rapid deterioration after endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is a rare complication. The authors previously reported three deaths from three centers. Three other deaths and a patient who experienced rapid deterioration have also been reported. Following the death at the University of Toronto of an additional patient who underwent surgery elsewhere, they canvassed pediatric neurosurgeons in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia for additional cases. METHODS An email was… 

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